Saxon Seaxe Anglo Saxon History
saxonhistory.co.uk
Map Position
This map shows the position of locations showing 'Roman Actual named locations ' containing 'anderida, bodiam, dubris, durobrivae, durovernum, portus lemanis, regulbium, romanbloomery' centered on Brookland in Kent.
Map Logic
This map shows the Romney Marsh Area during Roman and Early Saxon times.

The forest of Andredsweald is shown as a pale shaded green area with a Green border (For further details see our Andredsweald pages), which was impassable except where Roman Roads or rivers cut through it.

Roman roads are shown in black plotted from Ivan D Margary 'Roman Roads in Britain' published in 1955.

The red roads are taken from Ivan D Margary 'Roman ways in the Weald' published in 1948.

The Blue shaded areas show the paths of the rivers emerging into the Romney Marsh Area.


 
Icon Key:
Roman Major Fort
Roman Bloomery

A representation of the Romney Marsh Area in Roman Times

 

Please note the translations of Saxon place names mentioned in the text are lower down this page

This map shows the Romney Marsh area in Roman times, the high tide levels are shown 5 metres higher(Please see our Sea Level pages), and the river Rother/Limen flowed across the north of the Marsh passing the Roman shore fort of Portus Lemanis(modern Stutfall castle) finally emerging at the sea near modern day Hythe.

Behind Dymchurch there is an area currently just below sea level that appears to be a lagoon, it is recorded that the romans were extracting salt around the Dymchurch, Lydd and 'St Mary in the Marsh'(most likely a later Saxon settlement as Christianity only reached Kent in AD601) areas in the 2nd century, probably mostly from this tidal lagoon, implying a line of barrier islands that protected the lagoon from the sea.

Portus Lemanis(This name most likely originates from the early Latin 'Portus ille manus' which roughly translates into 'The Port of the hand' or more accurately 'Port that hand' ) is most likely to have been located in the lagoon. This implies the Roman Navy, Classis Britannica(CLBR) used the lagoon as a protected harbour for their fleet, with Stutfall Castle as its major defence. It also seems to imply that the Saxon Shore forts protected important harbours for the CLBR so Pevensey may also have also been a major port.

The Rother was tidal to at least Bodiam in Roman times and probably untill the 1300's, and the tidal effects probably reached further upstream past Etchingham to Tidebrook near Stonegate.

The shaded areas on the Marsh area are derived from research carried out at the University of East Anglia The "Kent A" cadastre - page 5 - Peterson 2002 the main data shows the differing soil types on the marsh - implying land at various points.
 


Saxon places names translated

Current translation for Rother
  rother derived from roðer - sailor or rower probably means sea inlet or deep river
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Limen
  lim derived from læmen - made of clay, earthen
  en derived from en - word termination usually means 'of'
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Dymchurch
  dym derived from demman - dam to stop water
  church derived from cirice - burial ground
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Hythe
  hythe derived from hythe - a harbour or port, usually an important or first one
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Lydd
  lydd derived from hlaed/hlida - a pile or mound or agger / a ford
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Stutfall
  stut derived from stut - gnats and midges
  fall derived from feoh el - the cattle people
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Pevensey
  pevens derived from fæsten naess - fortress promentory
  ey derived from æg - an island also eye, ye, sea
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Bodiam
  bodi derived from bodan - ships keel - probably shipyard
  am derived from hamm - Denotes a piece of land surrounded with paling, wicker-work, etc., and so defended against water, which would otherwise wash it away, so a valley settlement.
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Etchingham
  etch derived from weacg - metal
  ing derived from nering - a defended village
  ham derived from hamm - Denotes a piece of land surrounded with paling, wicker-work, etc., and so defended against water, which would otherwise wash it away, so a valley settlement.
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Stonegate
  stone derived from stenen - stoney - probably a roman road milestone or builders stone or seat of power
  gate derived from gat - an entrance - from gat eye of a needle or a hole - appears related to roman roads, or parks
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 
Current translation for Tidebrook
  tide derived from tyd - time - meaning regular
  brook derived from broc - a brook or stream
Use this translation on your websiteClick here to use this translation on your website

 



External References in no particular order :-
Original Manuscripts of the Anglo Saxon Chronicles
Online Anglo Saxon dictionary
Online Etymology dictionary
Open Domesday Book - The first free online copy of the Domesday Book
The Ermine Street Guard Roman re-enactment and research Society
The "Kent A" cadastre - page 5 - Peterson 2002
Archaeologia Cantiana Online
Romney Marsh Research Trust
Romney Marsh the Fifth Continent
VillageNet the reference guide to villages in Kent & Sussex
Global warming Flood Maps
The Anglo Saxon Chronicles
Google Maps - the core of the system
GeoPlaner - Useful site for plotting map data
Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars 55BC(Books 4 & 5)
Wikipedia - Caesar's invasions of Britain
Wikipedia - Portus Istus
The Geography of Claudius Ptolemy (Bill Thayers)
Roman Britain.org
Runetree Beowulf
Bayeux Tapestry Online
The Secrets of the Norman Invasion
Chronicles of John of Worcester
Battle Historic Society
Binsted village website(Mearcredesburnan Steðe)
The Spears of Andred
Find British Archaelogical Sites
Wealden Iron Research Group
Topographic Map of the UK

 

Copyright saxonhistory.co.uk 2013 - 2021
Contact me
Author: Simon M - Last Updated: 25/02/2021 08:07
All pages on our site
Data is derived from a number or sources including the Ordnance Survey Gazetter data overlayed onto Google Maps